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Kansas

Why go to College in Kansas?

Kansas blends the small-town feel of America’s heartland with the innovative culture of urban centers like Wichita, Manhattan, and Kansas City. Its higher education options range from major research centers like Kansas State University to community-oriented colleges such as Mid-America Nazarene University. The Kansas City Royals and the Wichita Thunder offer high-value sporting events while Massachusetts Street in Lawrence and the hotspots of Aggieville in Manhattan give students plenty to do during their free time.

Population

Kansas’ population of 2.9 million people is spread out over thousands of square miles of wheat, soybean, and corn fields. With around 390,000 people, Wichita is the largest city in Kansas and is home to many of the state’s colleges and universities.

Climate

Kansans know that blazing hot summers give way to frigid winters. The average annual temperature is 53.4°F. In the spring and early summer, Kansas is known for its severe weather.

Number of Higher Learning Institutions

Of Kansas’ 99 institutions of higher education, 32 are public schools. These include the University of Kansas and Kansas State University. Private schools include Bethel College in North Newton and Baker University in Baldwin City.

Sporting Events

Kansas hosts a number of professional sports teams, including the Wichita Wingnuts, an independent baseball team that plays in the Lawrence-Dumont Stadium, one of the oldest baseball stadiums in the U.S. In addition, the NCAA voted the University of Kansas’ arena “the most intimidating” in basketball.

Nightlife

Featuring plenty of hip urban centers near its state university campuses, Kansas offers a vibrant nightlife scene. In Manhattan and Lawrence, for instance, college students can hang out in various pubs on game day or find an assortment of nightclubs on the weekends.

What Options are Available for Colleges in Kansas?

On-Campus

Attending on-campus programs offers students the traditional collegiate experience. Besides friendships and instructor interactions, Kansas’ higher education institutions also offer on-site labs for future scientists, conservatories for budding musicians, and student farms to give tomorrow’s agriculturalists hands-on experience. Traditional students also have access to on-campus events, student clubs, ROTC, libraries, and college resource centers. The ideal student for this type of program is usually fresh out of high school and has few commitments outside school.

Online Programs

Online schools in Kansas are designed for working professionals, distance learners, and those raising families. The courses and academic rigor are the same as on-campus courses, but digital learners typically enjoy the flexibility to study when it is convenient for them. These students choose online colleges in Kansas for a variety of reasons. Some want to avoid the hassle of a commute, while others may want to spend more time with family or save money by living at home. Shy or reticent students may also find class participation easier and more natural in a digital space.

Hybrid Programs

Hybrid academic programs blend an online degree’s flexibility with a traditional face-to-face learning experience. Many hybrid programs offer in-person residential courses on weekends or during abbreviated summer terms in order to minimize the disruption to a student’s schedule. Other schools incorporate an internship, practicum, or lab component into their program’s face-to-face classes while permitting students to complete more theory-based courses online. Hybrid programs are especially popular in the hard sciences and at the graduate level.

Popular Degree Programs in Kansas

Kansas relies on agriculture, energy, and natural resource production for its economic backbone. The state’s higher education institutions, including online colleges in Kansas, reflect its commitment to operating effective businesses in these areas. According to Business Insider, the most popular major in Kansas is business management and administration, and a disproportionately large percentage of students choose architectural engineering.

  • Business Management and Administration

    This major is ideal for students seeking careers in finance, accounting, human resources, supply chain management, or marketing. From initial product development through the final phases of delivery and customer service, Kansas’ diverse economy gives students opportunities to gain practical experience with business management and administration in areas like agriculture, energy, and natural resources.

  • Architectural Engineering

    Learning everything from planning to construction, architectural engineering students are taught the full work cycle of engineered systems at large industrial and residential facilities. These systems include electric power, communications, acoustics, lighting, HVAC, fire safety, and sustainability. With this major, future engineers can take advantage of the swelling number of architectural engineering firms in Kansas City.

Education Trends in Kansas

Kansas spends slightly less money per full-time college student than the national average. Yet, the state allocates a substantially larger percentage of its tax revenue to higher education than the average U.S. state. This expenditure reveals Kansas’ commitment to higher education. In addition, a larger percentage of people in Kansas possess a bachelor’s degree than the national average, while the numbers of associate degree holders and graduate degree holders fall only marginally beneath the national mean.

  Kansas United States
Source: SHEEO and U.S. Census
Postsecondary Education Spending per Full-Time Student $6,898 $6,954
Percent of Tax Revenue Allocated to Higher Education 7.5% 5.8%
Percentage of adults over 25 with associate degree 8% 8.1%
Percentage of adults over 25 with bachelor’s degree 20% 18.5%
Percentage of adults over 25 with graduate degree or higher 11% 11.2%

Paying for College in Kansas

Nearly all higher education opportunities come with a price tag attached. While scholarships, grants, and personal funds can help cover a student’s expenses, paying for a two- to four-year education remains a challenge. Fortunately, the cost of a public institution in Kansas falls below the national average for in-state tuition. Some students choose one of the online schools in Kansas to have the flexibility to earn income while attending school.

Tuition Prices

Public colleges and universities often provide discounted tuition rates for in-state residents. Two-year institutions sometimes offer even deeper price cuts for in-state learners. In Kansas, the tuition is below the national average. When budgeting for college, however, prospective students should not forget the costs of books, transportation, room, board, and related personal expenses.

Financial Aid

Students in the U.S. can take advantage of public and private aid to help alleviate the financial burden of higher education. All students, no matter whether they plan to enroll in online colleges in Kansas or traditional programs, should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This application is required in order to be eligible for federal grants, loans, and work-study funds.

Grants and scholarships are free and help cover the costs of higher education. Students who receive loans, however, must pay them back in full with interest. For some loans, the federal government will cover part of the interest. To limit post-graduation debt, students should accept scholarships, grants, and work-study opportunities before loans, particularly if the loans are from private lending institutions that charge higher interest rates.

Cost for Online Programs in Kansas

Applicants to online colleges in Kansas are eligible for financial aid from the state and federal government, universities, and private organizations. Like traditional students, online learners begin the aid process by completing the FAFSA. Attending one of the many online schools in Kansas can help students lower their education costs. While most online programs carry tuition costs equal to those of their on-campus counterparts, other fees may not apply. For example, digital learners can save on on transportation costs, books, child care, and room and board.

Cost of Living by Region

Effective budgeting for higher education requires you to consider more than just tuition. You must also take into account the cost of living, which is determined by a school’s location. By choosing a city with a low cost of living, students can reduce the overall expense of their education and limit their student loan debt. Graduates with a low debt-to-income ratios have more choices about what jobs they can accept, where they can live, and what kind of lifestyle they can maintain.

Scholarships for Kansas College Students

Nolan Moore Memorial Education Foundation Scholarship

$500-$2,500; must be a resident of Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, or Missouri and enroll in a printing management or technology program
View Scholarship

Gloria Scammahorn Memorial Endowed Scholarship

TBD; recipients must be members of the Kansas Occupational Therapy Association and the American Occupational Therapy Association and studying to be an occupational therapist or an occupational therapist assistant.
View Scholarship

Kansas Nursing Service Scholarship

$2,500-$3,500 each school year; must study toward an LPN or RN and commit to working for a sponsoring partner in Kansas.
View Scholarship

The Kansas Comprehensive Grant

$100-$3,500; provided by the State of Kansas to needy families who are Kansas residents, who complete the FAFSA, and who attend an eligible college.
View Scholarship

Horatio Alger State Scholarship

$10,000; must be a high school senior who demonstrates critical financial need and who has overcome great obstacles.
View Scholarship

The Kansas Ethnic Minority Scholarship

$1,850; must be African American, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian or Pacific Islander, or Hispanic and meet established academic criteria.
View Scholarship

What's In Outdoors Scholarship

$1,000; must choose a wildlife or nature major at a Kansas college or university and show an interest in Kansas-based work.
View Scholarship

Kansas State Scholarship

$1,000; must be a Designated State Scholar who demonstrates financial need through the FAFSA.
View Scholarship

Coca-Cola Scholar

$20,000 over four years; must be a current high school senior at a U.S. school who demonstrates significant capacity for leadership and service.
View Scholarship

Elks Most Valuable Student Scholarship

$4,000-$50,000 over four years; must be a current high school senior, fill out an application, and interview with a panel of judges.
View Scholarship

Can all Scholarships be Used for Online Programs?

Most scholarships apply to both traditional and online colleges in Kansas. Scholarship recipients should examine their award letter to understand any restrictions that come with the funds, or inquire with the scholarship organization. Some scholarships may not apply to an applicant’s chosen school. Others may have extra programmatic or residency requirements. The only way to be certain an award will cover a particular program is to check with the scholarship-granting organization.

Employment Outlook in Kansas

Kansas residents enjoy a higher rate of employment than the national average, although wages in Kansas dip just below the mean. The state historically relied on agriculture as its economic engine, and experts believe farming jobs will continue to expand at a rapid pace. Kansas’ economy, however, continues to diversify. The booming health care and education industries are leading Kansas’ job growth trends just as they are in many states across the country. As a state with a growing population, Kansas has also witnessed considerable job growth in the construction sector.

  Kansas United States
Source: BLS and BLS
Unemployment Rate, May 2017 3.9% 4.3%
Annual Mean Wage, May 2016 $43,950 $49,630

Top Employers and Industries in Kansas

Top Industries in Kansas

  • Trade, Transportation, and Utilities: These industries include wholesale trade, retail commerce, the transportation of goods and services, and the provision of electrical power and water. Most workers in this sector find employment with private companies.
  • Government: This sector includes employment at the federal, state, and local levels. Fort Riley, an Army installation in Kansas, is a major government employer in the state.
  • Education and Health Services: Education and health services in Kansas are a single supersector. Educational employers include higher education institutions that provide training and instruction. Health services include hospitals and other health care providers.

BLS


Top Employers in Kansas

  • Spirit Aerosystems:15,000 employees
  • Fort Riley:12,500 employees
  • Sprint Corp:12,500 employees

Source: careerinfonet.org

Accreditation for Colleges in Kansas

With the accelerating growth of online schools, students must determine what program gives them the most value for their money. The best indicator of a quality education is a school’s accreditation. Accredited schools undergo a rigorous review process, although not all forms of accreditation are made alike. The two main types are national and regional accreditation. Regional accreditation is generally considered the gold standard. A regionally accredited school holds recognition with one of six regional accrediting bodies.

The best indicator of a quality education is a school’s accreditation.

For Kansas, that body is the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.
National accreditation typically applies to career-based programs. The Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) oversees both accreditation processes. CHEA is a private organization composed of more than 60 accrediting bodies that count 3,000 academic institutions among their members. Between it and the U.S. Department of Education, these two groups help standardize accreditation bodies and systems for U.S. institutions. To see a list of accredited online schools in Kansas, visit the CHEA website.

Resources for Students in Kansas

  • Kansas Board of Regents: The Kansas Board of Regents governs all 32 of the state’s higher education institutions, including its six universities. The website contains plenty of helpful information on Kansas public college programs and statewide education initiatives.
  • Kansas Association of Technical Colleges: Seven career and technical colleges form this association of schools that work together to provide businesses with skilled technicians in transportation, construction, manufacturing, and other industries.
  • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools: This regional accrediting body’s higher learning commission grants membership to colleges and universities in Kansas and nearby states. Its website includes a searchable database of its accredited institutions.
  • Kansas Independent College Association: Nineteen of Kansas’ independent, accredited, degree-granting colleges form this association whose goal is to promote the flourishing of small colleges, their faculties, and their students. This association also provides scholarship opportunities for students attending its member institutions.
  • Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference (KCAC): KCAC promotes intercollegiate competitive sports among 10 of Kansas’ top independent or private higher education institutions. Students at participating colleges can compete in a wide variety of men’s and women’s sports.
  • Kansas Jayhawk Community College Conference: Community college students across Kansas have the opportunity to compete in a variety of team sports, including baseball, basketball, football, tennis, and soccer. This conference includes all 19 of the state’s community colleges.
  • Kansas Association of Community College Trustees: This association links Kansas’ 19 community colleges together to create a cooperative learning system that promotes collaboration across the state. The website includes a list of participating colleges and a program search tool.
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